Skip to main content
Two copies of Real Life Digital's branding documents - one closed showing the cover, and the other open showing the contents

Blog Article

Why you need a Branding Document

Love it? Share it!

Your brand is the face of your business, and whether you spent millions on brand development or knocked up a logo in Microsoft Word at 3 o'clock in the morning you need to be thinking about what your brand says about your company.

A closed copy of Real Life Digital's branding document showing the cover

It's all about your brand

People often underestimate the importance of brand consistency, but think of it like this: if potential clients are seeing different logos, typography, colours, images etc. on your signwriting, website, social media accounts, printed materials and so on then how are you ever going to stick in their mind? How will they know that they can trust to come to you when they require your products or services? Will they feel confident that they've come to the right place? Will they even remember your company's name? Probably not. 

So how can you resolve the dilemma of retaining consistency when you use "John's Mobile Signwriting" for creating your vehicle advertising, "Valerie's Print Shop" for printing your business cards, "Rasheed's Creative" for producing your brochures and "Dominique's Digital" for building your website? They're probably not talking to each other. In fact Rasheed used to work for Valerie and they had a big falling out! And don't get us started on how Valerie and Dominique seem to speak different languages when it comes to design. The answer to resolving this consistency conundrum is simple. Have you ever heard of the saying "just making sure we're all singing from the same hymn sheet"? That's your branding document. Your branding document is your company's visual hymn sheet, and every time you hand it over to somebody who is doing creative or visual work for you, they will know and understand what they can or can't do with your brand. No inconsistent, individual interpretations that don't join up. And no translations necessary either.

A branding document or brand guideline pack will:

  • Ensure that your brand is communicated consistently across all platforms and mediums
  • Act as a visual rulebook for both digital and print designers to prevent them going on dangerous self-expressive artistic missions that don't relate to your message (it happens!)
  • Enlighten your staff as to what your message is and help them to maintain consistency from within the company
An open copy of Real Life Digital's branding document showing the contents

So what should a branding document contain?

Depending on the scale of your brand and the size of your company your branding document could vary wildly! I've seen branding documents that are literally hundreds of pages long and others that are only a few pages long. Typically, though, there are some things that should generally be communicated.

A branding document should almost always contain information on:

  • The history of the company as well as some sort of mission statement
  • Logo variations - common variants include single colour versions, social media icons, and logos with and without straplines
  • Logo usage, including safety zones, minimum and maximum sizes and examples of where it is and isn't okay to use the logo, as well as which variation to use where
  • The corporate colour palette with colour breakdowns for print and web use - ideally four values for each colour should be given (HEX, RGB, CMYK and Pantone)
  • Typography, including official corporate fonts as well as possible fallback fonts for use on the web etc.

A branding document can also contain other branding considerations such as:

  • Image styles and what type of photography should be used
  • Business card, compliments slip and letterhead designs
  • T Shirt, uniform or other clothing styles and designs
  • Signage specifications
  • Social media guidelines
  • Website layout
  • Copywriting guidelines
2 closed copies of Real Life Digital's branding document showing the cover

It works for you

A branding document can be as concise or as detailed as you require it to be. One thing your branding document should ensure is that your brand identity is always maintained whilst giving designers the flexibility to be able to create the best designs for you.

If you'd like to take a look at our branding document you can do so over on our brand resources page, along with downloads for our logos, fonts and other resources.

If you need a branding document you can get in touch with us.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Darren Fisher - Designer & Frontend Dev

Written by

Darren Fisher

Designer & Frontend Dev

Love it? Share it!

More from our blog

If you enjoyed this why not check out more articles from our blog?

Apr
24
2019
Client Advice
Chocolate cake with strawberry on top

Real Life Digital - Not just another web developer!

Have your cake and eat it! Find out how the Real Life approach gets you the quality and experience of working with a large agency without the overhead.
Read the article
Barry Fisher - Director

Written by

Barry Fisher

Technical Director
Mar
22
2019
Client Advice
Boy expressing anger with a shouty face and outstretched hands

Why the lack of industry standards makes the Real Life Digital team mad!

We all too often speak to potential clients who have been ‘scarred’ by their experience with other providers in our industry.
Read the article
Barry Fisher - Director

Written by

Barry Fisher

Technical Director
Feb
14
2019
Client Advice
Wooden board game letters organised to make the word 'Cost'

6 ways to manage the biggest cost influencing factors of a website project

Understandably it’s a very common question. However, here’s why there’s no simple answer, and how you can influence the bottom line.
Read the article
Barry Fisher - Director

Written by

Barry Fisher

Technical Director
Jan
22
2019
Client Advice
Pensive woman looking up and right inquisitively

What you need to know before you engage a web company

It's all about asking the right questions, taking your time, and choosing the right team for your needs.
Read the article
Barry Fisher - Director

Written by

Barry Fisher

Technical Director
Jan
14
2019
Client Advice
Angry man shouting through the handset of a traditional phone

The Trouble with Web Developers - 5 Pain Points most clients need resolved

Too many new customers come to us because they have invested significant time and money on a project and ended up dissatisfied.
Read the article
Barry Fisher - Director

Written by

Barry Fisher

Technical Director
Nov
19
2018
Client Advice
Hand counting from one to five

Five Top Tips To Pick a Winning Web Team

When you are investing in a new website for your business, it’s crucial that you pick the right team.
Read the article
Barry Fisher - Director

Written by

Barry Fisher

Technical Director